Thresher Shark (Pacific Common)

Thresher Shark (Pacific Common)


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Not to be confused with pelagic and bigeye thresher sharks, common thresher sharks are one of the most commonly harvested sharks off the U.S. West Coast. They are found in temperate and warm oceans around the world. In the eastern Pacific Ocean, they’re found from Goose Bay, British Columbia south to Baja California and also off Panama and Chile. They’re most common close to shore and are often found in areas rich with plankton, where their prey is also abundant. Thresher sharks are highly migratory species, travelling seasonally as temperatures change. In the eastern Pacific Ocean, they migrate between Oregon/Washington and southern California/Baja Peninsula, Mexico. Thresher sharks are named for their long, scythe-like tail, which is used to swat and stun fish before preying on them. They feed at the mid-levels of the food chain, mainly on small pelagic fish, including anchovy, sardine, hake, and mackerel, as well as squid. They have small mouths and are no threat to humans. Top-level predators such as killer whales and larger sharks prey on common threshers. Common thresher shark has a mild flavor. It’s firm, dense, and meat-like in texture. Raw thresher shark is white to tan with a pink blood line. Shark is high in protein and low in fat. It is a good source of niacin, vitamins B6 and B12, and phosphorus and a very good source of selenium. Shark may contain amounts of methylmercury in excess of the FDA’s recommended limit for nursing moms, moms-to-be, and young children (Courtesy of NOAA's FishWatch)
More information from NOAA's FishWatch

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